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Dance and Media Communications I :: Introductory

TEKS StrandExpectations
Foundations – Perception:
The student develops an awareness of the body's movement using sensory information while dancing.
The student is expected to:
  • develop perceptual skills, including the ability to draw connections between the formal elements of dance and principles of choreography in live and recorded works;
  • develop observational skills to understand works that communicate internal meanings, emotions, motivations, or societal norms
  • develop analysis skills to refine works that communicates internal meanings, emotions, motivation, or societal norms;
  • develop reflection skills to create new works that communicate internal meanings, emotions, motivations, or societal norms;
  • evaluate information gained from perceptual and analytical study of creative works;
  • apply information gained from perceptual and analytical study of creative works;
  • develop observational and cognitive skills in composition;
  • synthesize data observed in the environment into original concepts;
  • develop perceptual awareness of the formal dance elements and choreography; and
  • document the creative process from concept to completion
Creative Expression – Artistic Process:
The student develops knowledge and skills of dance elements, choreographic processes and forms in a variety of dance genres and styles.
The student is expected to:
  • research various approaches to showing intent and emotion through movement;
  • analyze various approaches to showing intent and emotion through movement;
  • create planning documents for capstone projects; and
  • execute planning documents for capstone projects;
Creative Expression – Performance:
The student develops knowledge and execution of technical dance skills and a variety of dance genres and styles through performing.
The student is expected to:
  • create professional-level products targeted for sharing with a wide audience either through the Internet or a site-specific performance;
  • collect digital files and artifacts for professional-level products designed for sharing with a wide audience either through the Internet or site-specific performance;
  • design a space, environment, or online presence to extend creative works; and
  • develop presentation skills.
Historical and Cultural Relevance:
The student demonstrates an understanding of cultural, historical, and artistic diversity.
The student is expected to:
  • develop analysis, perception, and reflection skills to connect external information to internal meanings, emotions, or societal norms;
  • evaluate information gained from perceptual and analytical study of creative works;
  • apply information gained from perceptual and analytical study of creative works;
  • research various approaches to show contrast (both visually and conceptually);
  • analyze various approaches to show contrast (both visually and conceptually);
  • analyze dances from a variety of cultures;
  • collect feedback from peers and audiences using tools such as surveys, questionnaires, or focus groups;
  • investigate subjectivity of dance and choreography;
  • investigate cultural connotations of dance and choreography;
  • identify connections between history, culture, community, and student communications projects; and
  • research the ramifications or impacts of a project on a community.
Critical Evaluation and Response:
The student makes informed personal judgements about dance and the meaning and role of dance in society
The student is expected to:
  • evaluate information gained from perceptual and analytical study of creative works;
  • apply information gained from perceptual and analytical study of creative works;
  • hypothesize what impact changes to movement will have on dance products;
  • contrast ideas related to movement and meaning to suggest new, original, or reinterpreted messages;
  • articulate creative research goals;
  • evaluate vehicles for dance notation such as creative research, storyboards, or sketches to determine how to strengthen a project;
  • collect digital files and artifacts for professional-level products aimed at sharing with a wide audience either through the Internet or a site-specific performance;
  • document research to refine a product;
  • collaborate with peers and audiences to refine a product using tools such as surveys, questionnaires, or focus groups;
  • identify criteria for evaluating his or her own and others' work;
  • develop presentation skills; and
  • research the ramifications or impacts a project has on a community.
Example

In this course, students will explore the cultural and historical context of dance and choreography, create movement designs in multiple media, and improve conceptual thinking skills. They will learn how to make connections between the formal elements of music, movement, and media production, and learn to use these skills to communicate ideas. Working with both dance and technology, students deepen their study through investigating the formal movement elements and principles of choreography. Through hands-on projects in both 2-D and 3-D media as well as digital imaging, multimedia, animation, video, and choreographic design, they conduct investigations of object, space, placement, time, and meaning. Studio projects and class discussions center on developing content and anchoring it to strong visual narratives. Additionally, students develop media literacy skills by deconstructing and reassembling modern media messages from movement sequences, motion pictures, television, and the Internet. Focused instruction covers examinations of current participatory media, social media, interaction design, curatorial skills, and audience involvement. Also, students develop response and evaluation skills from participating in creative reflections, and they hone presentation and communication skills through both oral presentations and performances as well as through mass communication strategies such as print or Internet presentations. The final goal for the class is for students to create a capstone project produced during the second semester that will challenge them to harness the skills explored, delve into an issue of concern in their lives, and use movement and digital media as an agent of change. Sample projects might include: 1) Creation of a public service announcement (PSA) consisting of a short video clip, including original script, filming, editing, sound, and animation on a topic of interest. 2) Design of a transmedia interaction or experience (e.g. performance art, site-specific work, time-based work), in which students create a campaign that encourages fans and the participation of the audience, and builds a virtual community beyond the life of the project. Each of these capstone projects must address a socially relevant topic or a need in the community identified by and explored through student research; implement the elements and principles of dance movement and choreography; demonstrate thoroughness in research and documentation (e.g. in a process diary); be grounded through dance theory and history; and contain documentation as to the project's statement of purpose, planning, and process (e.g. dance notation, prospectus, plans, models). Additionally, students will document the capstone project, preferably in an electronic or online portfolio.

Differentiation Strategies for Students with Special Needs
 
©Copyright 2015, Center for Educator Development in Fine Arts (CEDFA). This chart is developed by the Center for Educator Development in Fine Arts (CEDFA) as a resource for Texas teachers. All rights reserved.
Center for Educator Development in Fine Arts (CEDFA)
9233 Partridge Circle
Austin, TX 78758
Phone: 512-491-8087
©Copyright 2015; Center for Educator Development in Fine Arts all rights reserved.