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Vocal Ensemble II :: Follows Vocal Ensemble I

TEKS Strand Expectations
Foundations: Music Literacy Students continue to develop and refine technical skills and increase their music knowledge with literature selected for performance and listening. These listening experiences refine melodic and harmonic pitch.
Creative Expression

Within the class format, students perform from memory and notation and are part of more than one ensemble group. Individuality and independence are encouraged in student preparation (writing and arrangement) of compositions. Students gain greater music knowledge, independence, and skills. In preparation for a performance, students may:
• Write program notes
• Keep personal journals reflecting their thought processes in rehearsal and presentation
• Develop inventories of technical skills
• Develop and discover technical exercises that assist in refining performance skills
• Make recommendations for the completion of projects.

Historical and Cultural Relevance Students learn a repertoire representative of different cultures, historical periods, genres, and styles. They explore the historical and cultural influences affecting composers of their performance and listening literature. Characteristics of similar compositions from the same period and culture and interpretive data in scores help students accurately interpret the pieces they perform.
Critical Evaluation and Response Teachers help students isolate and define performance problems and concerns. Students practice constructive criticism of ensemble works- in-progress.
Example:

Paul Simon's Grammy Award–winning album, Graceland, features Ladysmith Black Mambazo from South Africa. Jeannine Harvey's Vocal Ensemble II class is learning some of the songs from this album for performance.

In the context of learning the songs, Ms. Harvey's class investigates the roots of Ladysmith Black Mambazo's singing. Ms. Harvey directs the class's inquiry by choosing several topics for student research.

Ms. Harvey writes the following questions on the board and asks for student volunteers to research answers and report back to the class. Her questions are these:
• Is Ladysmith Black Mambazo's singing representative of a particular musical style, genre, or culture in Africa?
• Describe its cultural roots.
• What are the political implications of Ladysmith's collaboration with Paul Simon? Look up the English translation of Zulu phrases Ladysmith sings in their songs.

Students who conduct the research fulfill one of three requirements for in-class presentations.

Differentiation Strategies for Students with Special Needs
 
©Copyright 2015, Center for Educator Development in Fine Arts (CEDFA). This chart is developed by the Center for Educator Development in Fine Arts (CEDFA) as a resource for Texas teachers. All rights reserved.
Center for Educator Development in Fine Arts (CEDFA)
9233 Partridge Circle
Austin, TX 78758
Phone: 512-491-8087
©Copyright 2015; Center for Educator Development in Fine Arts all rights reserved.